The Earth is But A Mote of Dust

Having one of those moments where you fixate on a single truth in the universe and marvel at it’s absurdity when taken out of context.

I’m fascinated that our bodies can adapt so profoundly when one source of energy is suddenly removed.

"Nope, no sugar Captain."

"Okay, well, usually that grow on trees. Shit. I wonder what changed out there. Check in the basement for the reserves. All stations: ENGAGE LIPOLYSIS! We’ll make it through this glucose-flavored winter, damn it!”

Haha, suckers.

Seriously though, chemistry is underrated. This stuff is fascinating to read.

If anyone needs me I’ll be over here down this Wikipedia hole.

neurosciencestuff:

Feelings of Failure, Not Violent Content, Foster Aggression in Video Gamers
The disturbing imagery or violent storylines of videos games like World of Warcraft or Grand Theft Auto are often accused of fostering feelings of aggression in players. But a new study shows hostile behavior is linked to gamers’ experiences of failure and frustration during play—not to a game’s violent content.
The study is the first to look at the player’s psychological experience with video games instead of focusing solely on its content. Researchers found that failure to master a game and its controls led to frustration and aggression, regardless of whether the game was violent or not. The findings of the study were published online in the March edition of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.
“Any player who has thrown down a remote control after losing an electronic game can relate to the intense feelings or anger failure can cause,” explains lead author Andrew Przybylski, a researcher at the Oxford Internet Institute at Oxford University, who said such frustration is commonly known among gamers as “rage-quitting.”
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High-res

neurosciencestuff:

Feelings of Failure, Not Violent Content, Foster Aggression in Video Gamers

The disturbing imagery or violent storylines of videos games like World of Warcraft or Grand Theft Auto are often accused of fostering feelings of aggression in players. But a new study shows hostile behavior is linked to gamers’ experiences of failure and frustration during play—not to a game’s violent content.

The study is the first to look at the player’s psychological experience with video games instead of focusing solely on its content. Researchers found that failure to master a game and its controls led to frustration and aggression, regardless of whether the game was violent or not. The findings of the study were published online in the March edition of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

“Any player who has thrown down a remote control after losing an electronic game can relate to the intense feelings or anger failure can cause,” explains lead author Andrew Przybylski, a researcher at the Oxford Internet Institute at Oxford University, who said such frustration is commonly known among gamers as “rage-quitting.”

Read more